Rounds's picture
Rounds

IEP Question...What would you do?

DIVI have a son who is 9 and has an IEP. He goes to his special education teacher for math (plus speech twice a week). but is main streamed for the remainder of day, however he is still struggling & I have spoke to his teacher about modifying more work because of his frustrations and work load yet she has only taken 5 words off spelling list (out of 25). No other accommodations have been made. Her explanation for not wanting to modify to much is because she does not want him to be lazy or not try hard. My son is very frustrated & is hating school. He takes an average of about 2 hours nightly to finish homework and he is so tired that when I start to read to him he falls fast asleep. I think its time for another IEP meeting or should I just meet with his teach one on one. I also don't want my son to use this learning disability as a crutch but I am worried.
DIVBaseballMom



quizzy's picture
quizzy

Having worked in special education for over 7 years my advice would be to request an evaluation of your child's learning ability first then follow up with another IEP meeting.


 There are modified lessons specifically used for special education students.


I agree that your son should give it a try first, but it sounds as if he has given it a "real" effort, so it is time to take the next step. Good luck!!

concerned mom's picture
concerned mom

Dear Rounds,


Sounds like we're in the same boat.  My son is only 4, and I'm already having problems w/ his public school teacher and the Child Study Team.  My son is in 2 schools, a special ed pre-k and our town pre-school.  Since trying both schools, we feel our son is doing so much better in the special ed setting.  I recently raised my concerns to the Child Study Team about the public school, telling them we want our son in the special ed kindergarden next year.  At this point, we set up a meeting to discuss the options, however, our case manager is pushing for my son to attend school in district.  Although they won't mainstream him, I still feel the private school is a better fit for my son.  His special ed teacher told me that parents have a lot of pull as to the options for their children in special education.  Based on what you said, it sounds like your son's teacher is not very cooperative.  I tried to talk to my son's public school teacher as well, and I got nowhere.  She told me to talk to the Child Study Team because they're the ones in charge of him.  I think this is ridiculous because his teacher is the one who sees him everyday and knows him best.  Anyway, with all this said, my advice to you is to contact the Child Study Team in your town, and set up a meeting in order to voice your concerns.  Request that your son's teacher be present at the meeting.  Also, if you have any outside support from therapists, doctors, etc., that may help.  Let me know how you make out.  Our meeting is in 2 wks, so hopefully we'll get somewhere with that.  Whatever you do, though, don't sign anything you don't agree with.  The team has to work w/ you to ensure you get what your son is entitled to.  If you can prove that your son is struggling, they have to do something.  I hope this helps.  Good luck!


Sincerely, concerned mom 

sweetkitten's picture
sweetkitten

There is a book called "how to compromise with your school district without compromising your child" by Gary Mayerson. You might find it helpful. It offers great advice with dealing with conflicts with the school over special education students.

ziggy's picture
ziggy

Someone mentioned getting an assessment then an IEP. This sounds like a good plan.

When people say listen to your child and the teacher isn't wanting to allow you to do that - then the teacher definitely is not listening to what his/her students are saying. Some people (including teachers) think that a person with special needs doesn't know how to speak for themselves, much less express what their needs are.

2 hours of home work for a special needs student is going way overboard. Sounds like a power play on the part of the teacher to make him keep going through this.