Annards's picture
Annards

Straight From the Mind of a Teenager.

I, personally, have gone through and read many of the topics posted under 'Raising Teens', and looking at the posts made by parents about their teenagers, I'm inclined to speak out about what's been...in the loop...to put it gently.

One of the posts made about their teen and their teen's use of drugs troubled me. The mother had said that she became involved with the PTA, and spoke to her children about the drugs and whatnot, and I applaud her for that.

But her mistake is that she probably didn't talk to her child as a friend one on one.

I find it extremely easy to talk to my father about things, and although I'm a girl of fourteen years, I understand what he's been through to an extent. I treasure when my dad and I go out to Sonic or a Bar & Grille and can just talk about anything. We're big goof balls that get caught up in the stress of everyday life.

But when you have a parent that can relate to you on an emotional level, and help you journey through your teens years, it helps us teens mature and understand the real life struggles much better.

I share with him stories of my school days, and he shares with me his experiences, how he got through them, his mistakes, and how the world is right now.

I, however, am in no way implying that I connect with just my father this way though. I do have a more difficult time talking with my mother, of course, our different beliefs and views to take a toll, I do cherish what moments and hour long talks I have with her where the age and family ties disappear, and we are nothing but good friends.

No, I don't date, and I have trouble at school getting teased for not doing so, but personally I believe that I should wait for the right man that I feel can meet me on a certain level, and that I know isn't dating me 'just for the heck of it'. It's a very hard thing to go through, and though I know parents went through the same thing, I'm being raised in a culture where stick thin is 'in'.

It's repulsive, and I highly encourage you to just talk to you kids on their level in terms they can understand. As for the above and eating disorders, I feel much better after knowing that curves are a great thing to possess. Heaven knows I have many of them.

I would, however, like to hear your opinions, so...reply away, my minions.



2xstepmom's picture
2xstepmom

You are a wise young woman.

Having raised a daughter who was emotionally scarred by people making unkind comments about her weight at 12 and 13 when she began to get chubby, I understand your point about the difficulties of being raised in the "thin is in" culture. My daugter became anorexic and still struggles with size issues.

You are a fortunate young woman to have a father who is willing to have the open, honest relationship you share. I made the decision at a young age to raise my children in friendship. At times it has been a struggle to balance that with parenting, though both my children as adults have told me they are grateful we have always been so close and are happy with their childhoods. They told me at the time they felt sorry for their friends who had parents who were parental only and/or not interested in friendship with their children.

Keep the lines of communication open with your parents and making your good choices. Thank you for posting!!!!

concerned mom's picture
concerned mom

You are wise and very mature for your age. I think it's wonderful that you have an open relationship w/ your parents and that you can look up to them, and you each respect one another. I only hope to have that kind of relationship w/ my kids someday.
I believe parents need to set guidelines and rules for their kids first. Then they can be a "friend" to their children. Obviously your parents have done something right b/c they're raising a very well-adapted young woman. Pay no mind to what others say. I was not the most popular kid in school either, but now I consider myself very fortunate. I have a wonderful husband who loves me, and 2 beautiful boys. Things usually fall into place and work themselves out over time. Your parents shld be very proud of the beautiful person you've become. Don't change for anyone.