Synergy's picture
Synergy

My problems with homeschooling

  Hey everybody, I'm kind of new posting here, so first of i just want to introduce myself and say hello.  This topic interests me some, but just like many people, I have my doubts about its' credibility. 

  The first concern I have is teacher credentials.  I am part of a family of 3 teachers and understand the process that goes into becoming a teacher quite well.  Years of determination, practice and ongoing learning are required to perfect the skill of teaching.  For people to simply come up and say they are able to teach their own children without the proper training and education worries me.  What kind of experience do you have to make up for the credentials required of state approved teachers?  If that is in place, fine, start teaching.

  Besides the academic aspect of the school system, the social aspect is just as if not more important.  There is really only so much a child can learn from books.  Group activities, social networking and  peer to peer interaction are such valuable tools in today's society that I could not imagine someone being neglected of it.  I do understand when teenagers especially voice their freedom and talk about how their skills are not being met, but that is just an excuse for laziness.  There are several options for students to exercise their skills if they feel underachieved.

  I just find conventional schooling to be such a powerful tool for young people that home schooling just sounds so limited.  Sure there are temptations such as drugs and violence, but as long as parents raise their children to be smarter than the people who pressure them into it, they would be fine.  It makes them stronger individuals in the long run.  If anyone thinks I am wrong in what I have said, I would love to hear your opinion. 



im_a_flymom's picture
im_a_flymom

Hello, I'm a homeschool mother of 3. I've made it a rule not to engage in DEBATES over my rights as a parent. Yes, that's right, it is my right as a parent, in this country, to homeschool my children.___ Never fear! My children are doing just fine, thank you.

My question to you would be this. Why do you feel the need to come to a homeschool message board and bash homeschoolers? Do you not have better things to do?

im_a_flymom's picture
im_a_flymom

LOL, I would also like to address you saying that " There is only so much a child can learn from books." I find this to be both ironic and hilarious. It seems also that you feel homeschool children are deprived of social interaction. It is obvious to me that while you may know alot about formal teaching in a school setting, you know next to nothing about REAL homeschooling. Most homeschoolers are involved in lots of "after school activites" such as Boy/Girl scouts, 4H, sports, art/music classes, just to name a very few. And yes, I do have a [filtered word]y attitude about this. Because basically people like you feel free to make ignorant comments in public forums about my and others' parenting rights/abilities. Honestly, do you not see how rude it is to do that?

gail's picture
gail

Teachers in classrooms do need a lot of schooling, not just to address the subject matter, but also to try to address moving 10 or 30 or 100 individuals through the curriculum and through the social dynamic of a classroom. And the 100--not an exaggeration, a high school teacher with five 20-student classes, that is a conservative estimate.
I think it would be worrisome to expect someone to teach in a classroom setting without the kind of training you delineate.
The purpose of that training is to address the deficiencies of scale that occur when the relationship between learner and mentor is diluted.
As far as the social aspect, the deficiencies of the classroom in socializing children are legion and well-documented. Removing children from the care of their primary care-givers for 900 plus waking hours a year is not optimal for the children, it is supportive of industrialized society. I learned that in my "Philosophy of Education" class, I think the Index in the catalog was a 2200 number.
One is not well-socialized by one's peers. Read "Lord of the Flies" as if it were just a story. The reason it is a powerful metaphor is because it rings true as just a story.
I have heard of bad home-school situations--third hand. The home-schools that I have observed and participated in are most like graduate level seminars. Statistically, home-schooled children do better academically, socially, and professionally than their peers in the classroom. Also, statistically they spend more time in books than their peers. Also, statistically, they spend more time in learning hands-on than their peers.

Synergy's picture
Synergy

Alright, I agree that I may have come off a little strong, but a lot of the things you talked about, do not relate to what I said. I never said its "not your right." Go right ahead. The only point I was making is what kind of government/educational approval did you earn to teach your children? I don't ask that in a condecending way, but as a simple question.

gail's picture
gail

Did I address your concern adequately? You are falling into the same trap as the others--it is not the government's right to approve who educates children, it is the parent's. This is acknowledged in that public schools are governed by elected school boards. (At least in my state, don't know about anybody else.)

im_a_flymom's picture
im_a_flymom

Synergy, MY point was, I do not need Your " go ahead" to educate my children at home. As far as "earning" anyone's approval.... I don't have to. I have met my state's legal requirements to homeschool. That's all I HAVE to do. These are my children and I know what is right for them.

gail's picture
gail

Synergy, my point was that conventional schooling is the system that needs to prove itself. Parents (even those with minimal formal education) who are willing to invest the time and energy in their child's education find that their child learns more, has better social skills, and better emotional development than do the children who attend the neighborhood public or private school. In my opinion, if you have left your child to conventional schooling for twelve or thirteen years, you have deprived your child of a valuable learning experience. It is particularly beneficial in the middle years, Grades Four through Eight.

mnmcogan's picture
mnmcogan

You talk about teacher credentials, but I ask you ar you aware of all those teachers who do not have their credentials yet and are still teaching. What makes you or anyone think that they are more qualified than a parent to teach?

You talk about social skills, by this statement I can assume that you have not been around home schooled children. Home school children have better social skills than most public/private schooled children their age. HS children tend to hang around with children and adults of all ages where as P/PS children are put into classrooms with children their own age and very rarely have the opportunity to interact with other children of different ages.

Are you aware that colleges and universities are actively seeking out HS students due to their high entry exam scores and their ability to adapt to the university live.

MOM2JJ's picture
MOM2JJ

I have been following this post and now I would like to voice my opinion. I would like to see the data that you have that states that homeschool schildren have beeter social skills that public/private school children. My husband's cousin's children were all homeschooled. They were socially different then the children that were schooled in public/private schools. You are incorrect when you say that private/public school children donot ineract with children of different ages. My daughter for instance interacts with younger children in our neighborhood, older children and children of hr own age in activites and church so unless you ha ve data to back this up I find that this is just our personal opinion and truly a fact. Again, you have me a little confused as to what point you re trying to make when you say that universities are trying to actively seek HS students due their high entry exam scores and ability to adapt to the university. Homeschool students and provate/public school students can have high entry exam scores but homeschool kids might have a problem dealing with a large campus of kids when they are used to be taught at home with maybe their sisters/brothers or a little group of kids. I don't know what schools you may be talking about about but in my school system, ALL of these teachers DO have teaching credentials, some have and are now going fortheir masters degree. Please show me the data where ALL of these teachers do not have teaching credentials. I personally donot believe that homeschooling is the best situation for MY child but this is a personal choice that each family has to make for their children.

acitez's picture
acitez

Data that children who were homeschooled are better socialized than their peers who were in traditional schools.

http://www.indiana.edu/~reading/ieo/digests/d94.html

ERIC Identifier: ED372460
Publication Date: 1994-00-00
Author: Aiex, Nola Kortner
Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading English and Communication Bloomington IN.
Home Schooling and Socialization of Children. ERIC Digest.

. . .

. . .

Stough (1992),looking particularly at socialization, compared 30 home-schooling families and 32 conventionally schooling families, families with children 7-14 years of age. According to the findings, children who were schooled at home "gained the necessary skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to function in society...at a rate similar to that of conventionally schooled children." The researcher found no difference in the self concept of children in the two groups. Stough maintains that "insofar as self concept is a reflector of socialization, it would appear that few home-schooled children are socially deprived, and that there may be sufficient evidence to indicate that some home-schooled children have a higher self concept than conventionally schooled children."

This echoes the findings of Taylor (1987). Using one of the best validated self-concept scales available, Taylor's random sampling of home-schooled children (45,000) found that half of these children scored at or above the 91st percentile--47% higher than the average, conventionally schooled child. He concludes: "Since self concept is considered to be a basic dynamic of positive sociability, this answers the often heard skepticism suggesting that home schoolers are inferior in socialization" (Taylor, 1987).

From the findings of these two studies, it would appear that the concerns expressed by teachers, administrators, and legislators about socialization and home schooling might be unfounded. Indeed, Bliss (1989) contends that it is in the formal educational system's setting that children first experience negative socialization, conformity, and peer pressure. According to her, "This is a setting of large groups, segmented by age, with a variation of authority figures...the individual, with his/her developmental needs, becomes overpowered by the expectations and demand of others--equal in age and equally developmentally needy."

Webb (1989), one of the few researchers who has examined aspects of the adult lives of wholly or partly home-educated people, found that all who had attempted higher education were successful and that their socialization was often better than that of their schooled peers.

That is just a partial quote from one paper, follow the link to get the references.
Not a lot of research gets funded because what research they do shows that students are better served academically and socially in home school (even with "uneducated" parents and self-generated study programs) than in institutional schools. So teacher's unions and public school administrators won't fund it, textbook companies won't fund it, and universities won't do it for free, because they get paid for teacher training, not for doing research.